Author Topic: Post your newest modern Chinese coin  (Read 594196 times)

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Offline comeaux

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #630 on: March 10, 2012, 09:53:28 AM »
I don’t usually post my coins up here unless it’s a set that may have not been seen frequently.

This set of 1980 Flowers from The Shanghai Mint  is not very common so I figured I would I post it up.

Currently it is the only NGC graded set …

 

Edit by badon: privacy
« Last Edit: March 10, 2012, 02:04:58 PM by badon »

Offline comeaux

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #631 on: March 10, 2012, 09:55:36 AM »
here is the box for the set ...


Offline badon

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #632 on: March 10, 2012, 01:55:24 PM »
I have been looking for those for a long time. This is the first time I've seen them. Thanks for posting them comeaux.

Everyone, please a have look at this posting, especially if you have shared photos on this forum:

http://china-mint.info/forum/index.php?topic=5260.0

Offline exchange

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #633 on: March 12, 2012, 08:43:09 AM »
I posted some of the below text in another thread as the subject of medals came about. I am reposting some of that text below to compliment my latest medal purchase.

The are a lot of Chinese medals that were minted by one of the three major mints but it does not necessarily mean they were authorized by the People's Republic of China. Many people think because it was minted in one of the 3 mints, it must therefore have been authorized by the People's Republic of China, but that is not true. Be careful when sellers advertise where it was minted, it is irrelevant if you want to buy a medal that was officially authorized by the People's Republic of China.
 
Mr. Ge's book is extremely helpful in identifying the medals that were truly authorized, located in the back of his book, categorized by year. If you do not have his book, one way I guess to somehow identify if the medals are from the People's Republic of China is from their COAs. The COAs of authorized medals have a particular look to them, at least  back in the 1990's. You will notice that the list of medals in Mr. Ge's book is quite small compare to how many medals are out there for sale and that is because in his book he only lists medals officially authorized.

One such medal is my latest purchase at $100 in OMP with original box. The 1996 one ounce silver medal commemorating the 100th Anniversary of Mao Zemin minted by the Shenyang mint. He is the brother of Chairman Mao. Mintage is 10,000 but who really knows how many are left.
This one is very interesting because it is very unusual to see an "official" medal\coin from a family member of an important governmental figure.

A friend of mine was undecided between this 1996 medal or the 2012 Singapore International Coin Fair silver medal which also has a mintage of 10,000 and more expensive... (go figure). I think when it comes to value this medal has good potential and its collector's base may very well expand outside the numismatic world.
BTW, I have yet to receive a reply from the officials at the Singapore International Coin Fair in regards as to if the medals are privately minted or officially authorized by the PRC. Their silence to me would indicate the ladder.
 
additionally.....
 
My interest towards the medals are very specific.
 
a) They must be minted by one of the 3 major mints.
b) They must be medals authorizied by the Chinese Government.(My only exception is the 1993 Genghis Khan, purchased last year).
c) They must represent a Chinese figure (maybe thats why I don't like the Pagodas)
 
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Offline pandamonium

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #634 on: March 12, 2012, 09:44:13 AM »
Thank you Exchange for another one of your unique Chinese coins.  My question is why are so many members against the 1984 pagoda coins?  With planned mintage of 260, isn't that low enough mintage?  Price of one set of four PF 69 Pagodas selling for $25,000, last year, must tell us they have some value.  This coin has a track record of price and has low mintage.  Is the design unfavorable?  As a new collector why is the pagoda considered lower in value than other less expensive Chinese coins?  Maybe it is all preference, could someone fill me in as I try to understand this market............

Offline badon

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #635 on: March 12, 2012, 02:41:31 PM »
I'm guessing it's because there's around 30 or 40 pagoda sets that are known to be out there, but haven't hit the market yet. If they hit the market all at once, they could really push prices down again. If some information pops up that says they have already been quietly sold off to collectors, then that would make people much more comfortable with buying them.

The CC can track them when they show up, so we can get an idea of how many are still available out there, and how many are locked away indefinitely in someone's collection.

As time goes by, the distinction between official and unofficial coins will be blurred. For example, the American coin market would go crazy over anything that the mint made, even if it was made by just one rogue employee for his own entertainment. That's what happened with the 1913 liberty head nickels, which are worth huge sums of money (but there's only 5).

Offline comeaux

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #636 on: March 12, 2012, 03:46:47 PM »
Mr. Ge’s book does not contain EVERY medal that was authorized by The People’s Republic of China  ;)

I would caution any new collectors to not rely on just one book for their entire collecting strategy or one member’s opinion for that matter, it's a good idea to utilize several resources including books, collectors, dealers along with the many knowledgeable members here on CCF to formulate a good strategy.

Also remember … in “collecting”, there is no right or wrong  :thumbup:

Offline exchange

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #637 on: March 12, 2012, 03:56:42 PM »
Mr. Ge’s book does not contain EVERY medal that was authorized by The People’s Republic of China  ;)


Yes, that is correct. The book stops at year 1997. I always wondered why Mr. Ge did not include the following years.

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low

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #638 on: March 12, 2012, 03:59:40 PM »
Thanks you Exchange. I only learn about Mao Ze Min today. Great man with great history.

Offline comeaux

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #639 on: March 12, 2012, 04:02:29 PM »
Yes, that is correct. The book stops at year 1997. I always wondered why Mr. Ge did not include the following years.

exchange

Ok maybe I should have been more specific …

Mr. Ge’s book does not include EVERY medal that was minted by one of the three major Chinese Mints between the years of 1979 and 1997. 

Offline exchange

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #640 on: March 12, 2012, 04:04:12 PM »
Thank you Exchange for another one of your unique Chinese coins.  My question is why are so many members against the 1984 pagoda coins?  With planned mintage of 260, isn't that low enough mintage?  Price of one set of four PF 69 Pagodas selling for $25,000, last year, must tell us they have some value.  This coin has a track record of price and has low mintage.  Is the design unfavorable?  As a new collector why is the pagoda considered lower in value than other less expensive Chinese coins?  Maybe it is all preference, could someone fill me in as I try to understand this market............

I am not really against the 1984 pagoda medals, especially when they are an official product of the PRC. Its just that I see to many of them around to justify the price. I am not even sure if the ones already graded are even authentic. Possibly some forgered medals may have found their way into the grading system. The track record to me is questionable. Every set I have seen sell so far was sold for a little more than a sales tax on $25,000.

Besides not having confidence in the authenticity of the graded medals, I also dont have confidence in their OMPs. The price/risk ratio is to high to take a chance on. If I would have purchased these medals back in the 1990's, then I would not had to worry about fakes, there would not have been a reason to forge them to begin with as no one wanted them.


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Offline badon

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #641 on: March 12, 2012, 04:06:20 PM »
The 1990's is when the first high quality fakes of the pagodas first showed up. I've been meaning to publish all of my diagnostics for pagodas. I started doing it for the goldfish, but have been diverted to other tasks. Once that info is up, you'll be as good at identifying fakes as I am.

Offline exchange

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #642 on: March 12, 2012, 04:08:33 PM »
Ok maybe I should have been more specific …

Mr. Ge’s book does not include EVERY medal that was minted by one of the three major Chinese Mints between the years of 1979 and 1997.  


LOL, yes I know he does not but thats because he only lists the medals that were officially authorized the the PRC. Could he have missed a few medals that were officially released by the PRC? sure, but I like using his book as a standard guide.

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Offline exchange

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #643 on: March 12, 2012, 04:09:59 PM »
The 1990's is when the first high quality fakes of the pagodas first showed up. I've been meaning to publish all of my diagnostics for pagodas. I started doing it for the goldfish, but have been diverted to other tasks. Once that info is up, you'll be as good at identifying fakes as I am.

Good to know, I did not know that. Then I guess one should have bought them in the 1980's to make sure of not getting fakes.

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Offline comeaux

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #644 on: March 12, 2012, 04:16:58 PM »
Could he have missed a few medals that were officially released by the PRC? sure,
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Yes ... several were missed, but I as well use this book for an excellent resource