Author Topic: Grading of pandas with abrasions  (Read 2232 times)

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Offline yibo

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Grading of pandas with abrasions
« on: April 16, 2012, 05:43:05 PM »
Hi All,

I am curious to know why some panda coins with obvious abrasions/toning e.g. PF-70 89 Pt with abrasions on the panda’s head:

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/China-1989-PLATINUM-PANDA-100-Yuan-NGC-PF-70UC-/320887657445?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4ab66513e5

can still be given such a high grade. Don’t graders take this into account when grading?

I appreciate your feedback!

Offline yibo

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Re: Grading of pandas with abrasions
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2012, 08:03:03 PM »
badon,

Thank you for the education!

Offline badon

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Re: Grading of pandas with abrasions
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2012, 08:08:10 PM »
No problem, and welcome to the forum!

Year of the Dog

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Re: Grading of pandas with abrasions
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2012, 09:46:04 PM »
Platinum is very tough to photograph.  sometimes it seems to almost soak in the light in frosted areas. 

Silver is the most reflective metal on the planet and is why it is so photogenic. 


Year of the Dog

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Re: Grading of pandas with abrasions
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2012, 09:46:44 PM »
Natural sunlight helps with platinum and gold.  It helps me anyway.

Offline badon

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Re: Grading of pandas with abrasions
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2012, 12:55:32 AM »
Silver is the most reflective metal on the planet and is why it is so photogenic.  

It's actually just the most reflective of ancient metals that mankind has mastered extracting, refining, and working thousands of years ago. In modern times, I think aluminum and rhodium are more reflective, and there are some exotic non-metal materials that are even more reflective.

Besides simple availability, one of the things that made copper, silver, and gold the "monetary" or "precious" metals, was their resistance to corrosion. "Corrosion" is what comes after tarnish, and is basically the same thing as "rust". The precious metals could all be shined up after they tarnished, and they would almost never actually corrode. Gold was the most precious because it wouldn't even tarnish.

Platinum has been around a long time, but was not treated as a precious metal at first. One of the original uses of platinum was to make fake gold bars that were then gilded with gold. Of course, now those platinum bars would be much more valuable than gold!

http://www.goldsovereigns.co.uk/fakes.html

"Platinum Forgeries
 Between the 1860's and about 1881, platinum was used, in Spain, to counterfeit gold coins including sovereigns. These were apparently made to order for a North American, the coins being mainly destined for use in South America. Although platinum is denser than gold, by alloying it with an appropriate amount of copper, it can be brought to the correct density. It was then gold plated, and apparently made very effective counterfeits. The practice is believed to have stopped only because the price of platinum rose to an uneconomic level. It is likely that the fakes would be worth more now than the originals. Platinum fake sovereigns have been recorded of shield sovereigns dated between 1861 and 1872."

Fascinating stuff...

Those were the last of the platinum fakes. The platinum fakes have been made since at least the 1400's, and maybe longer.

Platinum is a darker color than most other metals. Off the top of my head, the only metals I can think of that are darker is tungsten and maybe titanium. I'm sure there are others though. Osmium is very similar to platinum, and it might be darker too.