Author Topic: Robert Mish interview  (Read 5055 times)

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tamo42

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Re: Robert Mish interview
« Reply #15 on: March 14, 2012, 10:31:25 AM »
Tamo,

Since I go into Mish's shop somewhat 'regularly,' I can tell you that he does specialize in Chinese coins. He just doesn't advertise it. Instead he displays bullion for the average Joe Schmoe. Once I brought and sold him a 1/10th oz gold Culture of dragons coin to him before I knew what I was doing. He put it with the other 39 he had in the back, all of which were on their way back to China. He is as much of an expert on Chinese coins as (almost) anyone here.

Thanks for the interview link. I've fallen asleep twice trying to get through it. Its not boring, but I am tired :)


Fair enough!

Offline pandamonium

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Re: Robert Mish interview
« Reply #16 on: March 14, 2012, 11:07:50 AM »
To get our youth or new collectors into the coin market I believe in giving a silver coin.  In the US I have given away/tipped junk silver 90% dimes and educated our youth/adults on how expensive and important it is to own silver.  People need to have one in hand in order to change their priorities.  I tell employees of banks to go into the back room and sort thru the coins and pull out the junk silver and replace it with regular coins.  One lady listened to me about 5 yrs ago.  Within a year she owned more silver than me for dirt cheap prices.  (Now thats a lady a fellow wants to settle down with.  Single ladies please send photo of silver.)  Have met many folks that have inherited buckets of junk silver sitting in a barn corner.  Give a small silver coin to our youth to get them to start collecting.  Adults too.  In a bad economy it is better for the whole neighborhood to own precious metals then just you............The Chinese coin market gets more exciting as supply goes bye bye.

Offline dragonfan

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Re: Robert Mish interview
« Reply #17 on: March 16, 2012, 09:02:11 PM »
Things like that always entertain me. Whatever the crowd is doing, do the opposite, and you get rich. People are always so surprised by that, and they don't believe it when I tell them. Then I say "You can't be exceptional if you're not different", and then they stay awake at night thinking about it, haha.
I agree

Offline peng_you

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Re: Robert Mish interview
« Reply #18 on: March 16, 2012, 10:09:01 PM »
In regards to those who are not familiar with the role Mish has played in the Chinese coin market here are my 2 cents. Mish has  had a virtual Monopoly in the Chinese coin market here in the US for years until recently. Im sure he has been well rewarded. He is easily considered by many dealers as an authority within the Chinese market whether they like it or not. As the market has grown, his grip in the US has loosened as lots of new $ has come in to play. I would bet that not 1 US dealer has handled more modern Chinese or older Chinese coins than Robert Mish as of today. I'm sure with time that will change but his role is already cemented in history!
Peng_you

Offline Gilmore

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Re: Robert Mish interview
« Reply #19 on: March 19, 2012, 03:34:35 AM »
To get our youth or new collectors into the coin market I believe in giving a silver coin...  Give a small silver coin to our youth to get them to start collecting. 

I think it is a wonderful idea and do the same thing. Some family members, friends and colleagues of mine have became silver/gold investors or collectors once they had a real coin in their hand. I consider them to be the "Facebook Culture" survivors.

My nephew and best friend failed me though. I gave my best friend a beautiful silver panda, he was excited for 10 minutes and put it away. I am not sure he even remembers where he put it at.
My nephew purchased with his own money, the first salary he has ever earned in his life, a roll of Australian silver bullion based on my recommendation. That was many months ago. The package is still unopened and untouched. He did not even bothered to look what it looks like.

Offline badon

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Re: Robert Mish interview
« Reply #20 on: March 19, 2012, 03:59:32 AM »
My nephew purchased with his own money, the first salary he has ever earned in his life, a roll of Australian silver bullion based on my recommendation. That was many months ago. The package is still unopened and untouched. He did not even bothered to look what it looks like.

The seeds are planted, and since he bought it with his own money, I'm sure he hasn't forgotten where he put it.

Offline ghostrider80811

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Re: Robert Mish interview
« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2012, 06:16:29 AM »
I think buying a video games console to a kid is a bad idea. It is sterile entertainement. I am born in 1986. As a kid, I had access to the family computer and learned how to write software on it, out of curiosity. Internet helped immensely to learn as well, when it became available; I learned English by myself out of necessity, because the French internet had less information available. I bought my first own computer by selling some software I made. Since now I write software for a living, "computers" definitely allowed me to make money (and so to collect coins) and communicate with more people. The problem is now most platforms are locked up to turn the user in a consumer (iPad, Playstation 3...), so they actually don't get anything valuable out of using the device, just mindless and expensive entertainment.

That's remarkable.  I grew up watching TV, GI Joe, original DragonBall, and GI Joe.  Never really got into savings until the financial crisis of 08.  Best thing to have ever happened to me. It's so easy now to save and invest once it becomes a  habitual necessary habit.