Author Topic: Identifying Chopmarks  (Read 14194 times)

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Offline Birdman

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #15 on: May 26, 2011, 10:16:41 PM »
Poconopenn,

You have an attention to detail, which is an excellent trait in this field.  I'll be sure to take a close look for any misspellings or other red flags of a fake when the coin arrives in the mail.  Before I made the purchase, however, I did verify the PCGS number and things seemed OK (chopmarked trade dollar of the correct year).  I now even found a link to a prior sale of the coin at Heritage, which has detailed photos.  

http://coins.ha.com/c/item.zx?saleNo=67125&lotNo=23623

A quick glance shows that the chopmarks match up pretty well...but I will definitely scrutinize things later, when I have the coin in hand...

Offline poconopenn

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #16 on: May 26, 2011, 11:29:34 PM »
Birdman,

The Heritage coin is 1877-S. I was refereing to 1874-CC, the second picture in your first post. 

Offline Birdman

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2011, 07:42:13 PM »
Poconopenn,

Tonight I took a close look at the 1874-CC trade dollar under a magnifying glass.  It is a quite clear, and properly spelled, "In God We Trust" motto.  There is also nothing irregular-looking about the PCGS slab that it is in. 

I will definitely now keep a lookout for the misspellings of fakes in the future.  Keep posting your questions, we are all learning as we go along. 

Cheers,
Birdman

Offline ColinG

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2011, 09:21:03 PM »
I'm the editor of the Chopmark News, the newsletter of the Chopmark Collectors Club. Why don't you join us? It's free. Email me at chopmarknews@gmail.com

Offline Birdman

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #19 on: September 12, 2011, 09:22:41 PM »
Here's my latest acquisition.  I welcome any additional information on this type to supplement what is written on the label.

Offline ColinG

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #20 on: September 12, 2011, 09:53:39 PM »
Congratulations are in order as I was bidding on the same coin on eBay.

The 'chop' is not actually a chop in the normal meaning of the word. It's known as a wedding chop, the character is a double of the character 'hsi' [happiness] which is commonly used in weddings. In the 1930s wedding guests would give a dollar sized coin [Chinese Yuan Shih-kai's, or 'fatman' dollars, being the most popular] as a gift [money is most commonly given to couples at weddings in China].

If you're interested in chopmarks why don't you join the Chopmark Collectors Club [CCC]. I'm the editor of the newsletter. It's free to join and the e-newsletter is free too. Email me at: chopmarknews@gmail.com and I'll send you the last issue.
 

Offline Birdman

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #21 on: September 12, 2011, 10:01:46 PM »
Congratulations are in order as I was bidding on the same coin on eBay.

The 'chop' is not actually a chop in the normal meaning of the word. It's known as a wedding chop, the character is a double of the character 'hsi' [happiness] which is commonly used in weddings. In the 1930s wedding guests would give a dollar sized coin [Chinese Yuan Shih-kai's, or 'fatman' dollars, being the most popular] as a gift [money is most commonly given to couples at weddings in China].

If you're interested in chopmarks why don't you join the Chopmark Collectors Club [CCC]. I'm the editor of the newsletter. It's free to join and the e-newsletter is free too. Email me at: chopmarknews@gmail.com and I'll send you the last issue.
 

Thanks, Colin.  I am already a member.  Indeed, it was membership in this group that alerted me to the auctioning of this batch of coins.  Sorry we were competing on this piece.  I was outbid on a few of the others (perhaps by you).  I liked the ink chopped coin too.

Offline Bamboo

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #22 on: September 13, 2011, 01:46:35 AM »
 :001_smile:Finally, a seldom talked about topic " chopmarks"
Colin, I would appreciate a copy of your e-newsletter (already sent you an email).

What I know is, in general,
Type I Chopmarks (the small ones) were used on coins which circulated in Shanghai and its vicinity, and Type II Chopmarks (the big ones) were applied from the 1800's in the Kuangtung and Fujien regions. 

Offline Bamboo

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #23 on: September 13, 2011, 01:50:56 AM »
American Trade Dollars - Unlike the two varieties of Mexican Dollars which circulated throughout China and were accepted by Chinese of all levels, many of the new coins were circulated within limited areas such as the southern coastal cities or in the areas under the issuer's authority.

Offline Panda Halves

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #24 on: September 29, 2011, 09:23:47 PM »
Picked up this 1783 8 Raeles coin with a couple of chop marks on it.
There is a small "o" chopmark next to a sideways Chinese character for 10,000 or "万".
Together it makes an OK chopmark!
 :biggrin:

Offline Birdman

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #25 on: October 24, 2011, 07:47:25 PM »
I picked up this 1875-S Trade dollar this weekend.  It has chops on the front and back.  I've zoomed in on a particularly clear chop on the front.  Can anyone translate it?  Thanks.

Offline dragondollar

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #26 on: October 24, 2011, 11:58:29 PM »
Hi, your chopmark looks like a variation of the character 贯 (with a little 宀 added on top). 贯 means a string of 1000 cash coins, which would be the value of a silver dollar at the time. The other chopmark, at the right, looks like 公.

Offline Panda Halves

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #27 on: October 25, 2011, 12:08:53 AM »
shí
True, real, actual, or genuine in this case.

Offline dragondollar

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #28 on: October 25, 2011, 12:19:13 AM »
Thanks for the correction Panda Halves, I didn't know the traditional form of 实!
Can you confirm the meaning of other chopmarks on this coin?

Offline Birdman

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Re: Identifying Chopmarks
« Reply #29 on: December 02, 2012, 03:55:04 PM »
I made a new purchase this week, so I thought I'd revive this thread on Chopmarks.  I admit limited knowledge on the topic, but I find it interesting.  Here's my latest question/challenge for those who know about chopmarks.

This Kwangtung dollar has what appears to be a "J" chopmark on the reverse. Or maybe if you turn it upside down it is a crude version of the symbol for the English Pound Sterling (£)?  I don't know.  Does anyone recognize this chop as having a particular meaning?  Thanks.