Author Topic: Hello!! Stationed In Korea & Started Panda Coin Collection  (Read 404 times)

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Offline armysmoke

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Hello!! Stationed In Korea & Started Panda Coin Collection
« on: October 04, 2019, 08:33:28 AM »
Hello Everyone,

I'm stationed in South Korea and just started collecting the Panda coins. I only have a small collection  N14

2016 Silver 10 Yuan Panda (one of first 30,000 struck) MS70 by NGC
2016 Gold 10 Yuan Panda (one of first 750 struck) MS70 by NGC
2019 Silver 10 Yuan Panda First Strike MS70 by PCGS
2019 Gold 10 Yuan Panda First Strike MS70 by PCGS

I have a question. Which do most collectors prefer NGC or PCGS?

Also, what is the best price guide of Panda coins? I have used the price guide on NGC and PCGS but some coins have a huge difference in price between the two.

v/r
Tom

Offline Agpanda

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Re: Hello!! Stationed In Korea & Started Panda Coin Collection
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2019, 09:26:12 AM »
Hi and welcome to the forum
Look for PandaCollector and his pricepedia, link below
I must say that I prefer NGC myself

Offline armysmoke

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Re: Hello!! Stationed In Korea & Started Panda Coin Collection
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2019, 09:46:19 AM »
Thank you. I subscribed to the pricepedia!

Offline KeyDate1/2ozPandas

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Re: Hello!! Stationed In Korea & Started Panda Coin Collection
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2019, 10:22:07 AM »
Modern Chinese gold, silver, platinum, palladium and brass NGC dominates the market.  I would estimate 90%+ of my customers prefer NGC and will pay a premium for NGC slab.  This can change in the future, but since 2012 NGC slabs have brought a premium to PCGS. For silver, I will never buy a PCGS slab because they tend to develop white spots much more often than NGC slabs.  White spots ruin eye appeal and value of the coin.   

By the looks of your purchases you are truly a new collector, which is great on one hand because you are getting in at a great time in the cycle, but bad on another hand because you have a lot to learn about what makes a coin valuable in the long run.  If you are collecting for joys of owning something you like and don't care that you will lose money on it then buy what is attractive or sentimental in some way.  If you are really investor then you need to learn a few basics about the coin industry, below are some ideas to think about:

1) Manufactured rarities are overpriced when issued and will over time revert to baseline price.  For example, a silver coin with a mintage of 5M is still a bullion coin even if it is placed in slab that state first 1000 struck, nobody in the future will pay a premium for that slab as it was manufactured as a marketing gimmick by the grading companies.  Another example is I take 100K coin and 200K mintage coin and combine them in a fancy box and call it a 2K special mintage set.  That set after the initial telemarketing dump will revert back to the price of the individual coins and box/COA will have zero value.

2) Rarity gives coins value over the long term.  Right now you can buy 1990 1oz gold omp panda for the same price as 2016-2019 30g panda, yet 1990 panda is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude rarer, buy the 1990s.  There is an exception to the rarity rule, which is called the mintage trap, that is I can produce 100 different medals (not currency coins) with mintages of 100 each.  I can claim each coin is only 100 mintage, but every few weeks I come out with new design, this is same game as in item 1), manufactured rarities, the only person that gets rich is the one manufacturing them and dumping them on novice collectors.

3) As rarity data comes out coins value go up.  As more people learn what is rare those coins tend to outperform less rare coins.

4) Always look at the coin not the slab.  If a coin is graded MS70 but it looks like MS68 its price will be similar to MS68 coin than MS70.

5) Pick coins that have a growing number of collectors over the foreseeable future.  For example, the US coin market I believe is in perpetual decline, because as the baby boomers retire they will need to cash out for living expenses.  Don't bail them out until almost all of them have cashed out and numismatic premiums have dropped 40-90% relative to market highs, give it another 10-15 years.  Once all of them have gave up their collection at a fraction of their cost basis, that will be the time to step in and start a new cycle.  On the other hand countries with young and a growing number of collectors, say China, is a screaming long term buy. 

6) Price guides can be a helpful guide to avoid paying too much, but a better approach is to make your own price guide using auction records.  All online auctions have archives you can search for free.  If doing that research is too much work then best to be just a collector that consumes coins rather than invests in coins.

These are the starting points about learning to invest in coins, follow just these and you are much more likely to make some money and enjoy your collection 10 years from now. 

Offline armysmoke

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Re: Hello!! Stationed In Korea & Started Panda Coin Collection
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2019, 06:04:54 AM »
Wow, thank you very much for breaking things down for me. I'm collecting for the fun of it but I might as well learn to make a profit too.

Offline pandamonium

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Re: Hello!! Stationed In Korea & Started Panda Coin Collection
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2019, 08:05:02 AM »
Buy the books as they are a great guide.      Peter's latest Panda Book 3 and Mr Ge's Purple book.       For MCC focus on buying first year 1979 or other early years like 1980's and 90's.        Read many comments here on what is rare.      New collectors usually like new issue due to superior designs but the early years have potential.   
Common MCC will not gain much, only buy the rare......
I see more demand now and fewer rare coins that are affordable to new collectors so you have time but it is running out....