Author Topic: mini test  (Read 58461 times)

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Offline KeepOnTrying!

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Re: mini test
« Reply #135 on: June 23, 2016, 07:26:57 AM »
China is a powerhouse of economic activity.
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Offline NBM

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Re: mini test
« Reply #136 on: June 23, 2016, 11:47:40 AM »
China used more cement between 2011 and 2013 than the U.S. used in the entire 20th Century.

Offline moosician

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Re: mini test
« Reply #137 on: June 23, 2016, 11:48:11 AM »
Yes, things are moving fast in China. On the subject of the expanding coin collector/buyer base, no doubt panda coins are low in supply (key/semikeys) but one thing to take into account imo is that besides Pandas, there is a wide variety of other MCC offering for buyers. Besides the ever popular lunars, commemoratives and cultural coins, some recent year minted series are getting popular too for example good fortune, auspicious culture, world heritage, Dun Huang, grottoes, sacred mountain... etc. there are plenty. From my understanding pandas are always (been?) regarded as bullion generally in China and the market for them is still small comparing to other coins. So i guess the question is besides panda set demand from wealthy individuals, how will be the panda market as a whole be projected in the future?

Offline PandaCollector

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Re: mini test
« Reply #138 on: June 23, 2016, 11:51:36 AM »
you've got to see China in person to grasp what has been going on here.  Wow.

+1

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Peter Anthony
China Pricepedia
www.pandacolleactor.com

Offline Pandaguy

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Re: mini test
« Reply #139 on: June 23, 2016, 01:00:45 PM »
China used more cement between 2011 and 2013 than the U.S. used in the entire 20th Century.
Very interesting point you make regarding cement usage. It is important to know that in China, everything I saw, new and old construction (residential and commercial), had concrete poured into the walls of structures. Even the roofs were concrete! I watched them do this. In U.S. we mostly use wood framing in residential construction.

Offline Tao-Panda

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Re: mini test
« Reply #140 on: June 23, 2016, 02:06:00 PM »
China used more cement between 2011 and 2013 than the U.S. used in the entire 20th Century.

Of course... they build dozens of million unsaleable apartments  :001_rolleyes:

Offline PandaCollector

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Re: mini test
« Reply #141 on: June 23, 2016, 05:28:03 PM »
Of course... they build dozens of million unsaleable apartments  :001_rolleyes:

I have seen very little of this in my travels around the country. China is a huge place and I'm sure it is true somewhere, that not every development is successful. However, usually if I return a year or two later the formerly deserted towers look occupied. I am curious about it, too, due to Western news stories. At this point, based on personal, random, unscientific experience, I suspect it may be close to an urban myth.

Back to discussing coins?

Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
China Pricepedia
www.pandacolleactor.com

Offline Panda Halves

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Re: mini test
« Reply #142 on: June 23, 2016, 06:04:10 PM »
I have seen very little of this in my travels around the country. China is a huge place and I'm sure it is true somewhere, that not every development is successful. However, usually if I return a year or two later the formerly deserted towers look occupied. I am curious about it, too, due to Western news stories. At this point, based on personal, random, unscientific experience, I suspect it may be close to an urban myth.
Some huge developments create sprawling unoccupied ghost cities and super malls as is evident by this YouTube clip on Dateline.
How much concrete do projects like this use?
How much do these projects factor into China's inflated GDP claims?
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=rPILhiTJv7E

Offline PandaCollector

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Re: mini test
« Reply #143 on: June 23, 2016, 07:48:49 PM »
Some huge developments create sprawling unoccupied ghost cities and super malls as is evident by this YouTube clip on Dateline.
How much concrete do projects like this use?
How much do these projects factor into China's inflated GDP claims?
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=rPILhiTJv7E

This report was aired in 2011. Here are links to 2012 photos of Zhengzhou New District. The writer commented (back in 2012) that the area was starting to fill up:

http://www.newgeography.com/files/zhengzhou2.jpg
http://s245.photobucket.com/user/z0rgggg/media/another%20one/12041510534f5c50be7fd02cf4.jpg.html

It would be interesting to visit these same places today and see how the "ghost cities" have fared since the 2011 broadcast. It's a big deal to own your own flat in China and I don't think the demand has hit the saturation point yet. For what it's worth, I know three families that have purchased and moved into new flats in the last six months. Just like in the USA, people buy a lot of new furniture and appliances when they do that. Good for GDP.

Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
China Pricepedia
www.pandacolleactor.com

Offline KeepOnTrying!

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Re: mini test
« Reply #144 on: June 23, 2016, 09:03:43 PM »
My visit to China in 2014 was made despite the "concerns" of an acquaintance who attempted to show me YouTube videos and web clips of what I termed baseless propaganda. I am happy I made that trip because it deepened my understanding of the society, people and country but by no means made me an expert.

I don't think you can discuss anything China in one or two paragraphs so I won't even try here. Except to say that things that don't initially make sense become clearer with time, so watch that country closely and learn!
KeepOnTrying and Never Give Up!
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Offline KeepOnTrying!

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Re: mini test
« Reply #145 on: June 23, 2016, 09:20:45 PM »
Yes, things are moving fast in China. On the subject of the expanding coin collector/buyer base, no doubt panda coins are low in supply (key/semikeys) but one thing to take into account imo is that besides Pandas, there is a wide variety of other MCC offering for buyers. Besides the ever popular lunars, commemoratives and cultural coins, some recent year minted series are getting popular too for example good fortune, auspicious culture, world heritage, Dun Huang, grottoes, sacred mountain... etc. there are plenty. From my understanding pandas are always (been?) regarded as bullion generally in China and the market for them is still small comparing to other coins. So i guess the question is besides panda set demand from wealthy individuals, how will be the panda market as a whole be projected in the future?

Add to this mix the average Chinese citizen’s attitude towards the panda coins of old. One of my recently arrived Chinese clients characterized Panda coins as something the government manufactured for sale overseas to generate revenue.

Obviously this may not be representative of the view in China but the pre-2000/pre-2010 coins may be more for the hard core enthusiasts in China who have more discretionary income compared to the average citizen of whom the new release panda coins may be at par with all the recent mintages you have outlined in your post.

Again, we are just trying to figure out future directions and magnitude of interest in Pandas coin collection in China (and in other parts of the world).
KeepOnTrying and Never Give Up!
That lion is also after you!

Offline poconopenn

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Re: mini test
« Reply #146 on: June 23, 2016, 09:31:20 PM »
It would be interesting to visit these same places today and see how the "ghost cities" have fared since the 2011 broadcast. It's a big deal to own your own flat in China and I don't think the demand has hit the saturation point yet. For what it's worth, I know three families that have purchased and moved into new flats in the last six months. Just like in the USA, people buy a lot of new furniture and appliances when they do that. Good for GDP.

Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
China Pricepedia
www.pandacolleactor.com


There are new "small ghost cities" nearby cities which are depending on heavy industry production, such as steel and coal mining in the northern and south eastern part of China. Most large cities have relaxed the residential requirement recently and make the movement of population form countryside to city accelerated. It takes more than 5 years (2010-now) to fill the "ghost apartment buildings" at Shanghai. They are many apartments bought by investors and have never occupied.    

Offline PandaCollector

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Re: mini test
« Reply #147 on: June 23, 2016, 11:56:52 PM »
Add to this mix the average Chinese citizen’s attitude towards the panda coins of old. One of my recently arrived Chinese clients characterized Panda coins as something the government manufactured for sale overseas to generate revenue.

Ten years ago many people claimed that Panda coins would always lag behind "true" Chinese coins in value.

Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
China Pricepedia
www.pandacollector.com

Offline Tao-Panda

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Re: mini test
« Reply #148 on: June 24, 2016, 04:21:12 PM »
I have seen very little of this in my travels around the country. China is a huge place and I'm sure it is true somewhere, that not every development is successful. However, usually if I return a year or two later the formerly deserted towers look occupied. I am curious about it, too, due to Western news stories. At this point, based on personal, random, unscientific experience, I suspect it may be close to an urban myth.

The only thing I know is that chinese banks are full of non-performing loans and the amount of derivatives is outrgeous... as western banks in fact.

Offline Birdman

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Re: mini test
« Reply #149 on: June 26, 2016, 09:59:59 AM »
The view of Shanghai that greeted me upon arrival to the hotel room tonight.  Wow!  This is quite the modern city with ample affluence.  I hope to make it to the coin market tomorrow.