Author Topic: Post your newest modern Chinese coin  (Read 459852 times)

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Offline badon

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Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« on: October 23, 2010, 01:02:44 AM »
Everybody likes eye candy. Show us the most recent addition to your coin collection!

Offline PandaCollector

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2010, 01:16:10 PM »


Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
http://www.pandacollector.com

Offline badon

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Offline PandaCollector

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2010, 03:23:05 PM »
I bought it at PandaAmerica on Thursday. They received 100 out of the 300 they had ordered. The price was a reasonable $99.99.

Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
http://www.pandacollector.com

Offline PandaCollector

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2010, 06:08:40 PM »
Doesn't anyone else get new coins? Anywhere, here is a Panda that was a challenge to find, for me at least. The fun in collecting isn't necessarily to own the most expensive coin (although that's nice too!) but to locate the scarce ones. Stats: 10 Yuan 1 oz. silver Panda, Mintage 20,000, 20th Anniversary and Listing Of China CITIC Bank.



Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
http://www.pandacollector.com

Offline badon

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2010, 01:00:31 AM »
Locating the scarce coins takes some time. Having the cash ready to go at the moment when a coin you want appears takes even longer! Here's today's prize:

Offline badon

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2010, 01:15:27 AM »
This coin is cool because the GOLD is dirty! No lie, check it out - Anything not yellow is not gold. Sometimes you get copper spots, and sometimes you get chunks of silver, steel, lead, ham and eggs, etc in your precious gold coins. Sorry it's a bit fuzzy, I need to get a better camera. You can see the gray color just fine though.

Offline PandaCollector

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #7 on: October 27, 2010, 03:55:46 AM »
For me, the impurities create an effect that resembles snow falling around the tiger. What a beautiful coin and design.

Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
http://www.pandacollector.com

Offline badon

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2010, 03:27:11 PM »
Yeah, it is gorgeous. I have never seen a gold coin - or any coin - with solid impurities in it. The closest thing to it I've seen are fairly common "lamination" errors, where a layer of dirt gets rolled into the metal, and later the layer prevents bonding of the metal on both sides, so they separate and peel away like lamination on a piece of paper.

We all know about copper spots and things like that, but those are very diffuse, blended, impurities that you can't see until they start to develop a patina. In this case, these are solid chunks of something. They look to me like iron filings, but I suppose they could be almost anything. They're not struck into the coin, like a "lint mark" would be, because they have a raised burr around them.

The burr looks strange though, and I really think that a very thin layer of gold that was on top of the non-gold inclusion was lifted away from the coin in the same style as a lamination error while the die retracted. That exposed the impurity, and left a slight burr to confuse people who haven't seen it before. This coin grades PF70, so the NGC graders must have seen this before, and correctly granted a high grade. I have a metalworking background, so with some thought, I was able to figure out what these tiny grey spots were.

Lint marks never have a burr, because the pressure of the die keeps them down. All very fascinating.

Offline larrydreher

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2010, 06:20:53 PM »
That coin seems very difficult to find.  I have one on the way from China.  Funny thing is that NGC didn't even have it in the appropriate registry set.  Last time I looked only two had been graded.  They told me they would be adding it to the registry soon.

I can't make sense out of what makes one commemorative Panda more difficult to find than another.  The mintage is certainly no indication.

Doesn't anyone else get new coins? Anywhere, here is a Panda that was a challenge to find, for me at least. The fun in collecting isn't necessarily to own the most expensive coin (although that's nice too!) but to locate the scarce ones. Stats: 10 Yuan 1 oz. silver Panda, Mintage 20,000, 20th Anniversary and Listing Of China CITIC Bank.



Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
http://www.pandacollector.com

Offline badon

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2010, 08:12:18 PM »
I can't make sense out of what makes one commemorative Panda more difficult to find than another.  The mintage is certainly no indication.

I get the impression that the most action is going on in the "new" coin market. With over 3000 years of history, the Chinese people may not be as fascinated with old stuff like we Westerners are. I suppose it's an extreme version of the same phenomenon we see with ancient coins in Europe versus America. American are unfamiliar with them, and expect them to be museum pieces, whereas Europeans dig them up on a daily basis.

Chinese people seem to see greatness in their present and future, rather than their past, which I suppose makes sense considering where China stands now in comparison to their recent past. It seems the average Chinese coin buyer does not want a memento from 1985 so much as one from 2011!

Offline PandaCollector

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #11 on: November 02, 2010, 01:03:32 AM »
That coin seems very difficult to find.  I have one on the way from China.  Funny thing is that NGC didn't even have it in the appropriate registry set.  Last time I looked only two had been graded.  They told me they would be adding it to the registry soon.

I can't make sense out of what makes one commemorative Panda more difficult to find than another.  The mintage is certainly no indication.


It seems like these are either extraordinarily tightly held, there are bags of them still resting in a vault somewhere, or only a fraction of the authorized mintage was actually struck.

Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
http://www.pandacollector.com

Offline larrydreher

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #12 on: November 02, 2010, 11:28:45 AM »
The story I heard is that most of the coins were distrbuted to bank employees which would make them "tightly held" I guess.  The average employee might just throw them in a drawer and forget about them.  I assume there is some loyalty to the company too and dumping a company gift on the secondary market might be frowned upon.

Offline PandaCollector

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2010, 01:44:28 PM »
The story I heard is that most of the coins were distrbuted to bank employees which would make them "tightly held" I guess.  The average employee might just throw them in a drawer and forget about them.  I assume there is some loyalty to the company too and dumping a company gift on the secondary market might be frowned upon.

I heard that, too. However it's been three years since issuance and the coins are worth quite a bit of money — a month of wages for many probably. It seems improbable that only a couple of dozen employees, or ex-employees, out of 20,000 would have converted these into cash by now. It also is a bit peculiar that CITIC employees are so much more retentive of their gifts than employees at other banks that have had Pandas minted for them.

Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
http://www.pandacollector.com

Offline larrydreher

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Re: Post your newest modern Chinese coin
« Reply #14 on: November 02, 2010, 03:55:46 PM »
I agree with all those thoughts.  That's what makes collecting these "event commemoratives" that much more interesting.  I have a feeling some with high values today now will settle down eventually.  I hate paying what I did for that coin but since I'm in it for collecting, I don't mind if a pay a little too much for a couple coins that complete my collection.

The other thing about the CITC coin is that only two have been graded and they both recieved grades lower than 68 which is unusual for recent pandas.  Does that mean that the bank employees who sell them play with them a bit first? :confused1:

Are you planning to get yours graded peter?