Author Topic: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass  (Read 20212 times)

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Offline poconopenn

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #15 on: October 03, 2014, 03:00:56 PM »
DIY conservation is part of fun for hobby in coin collection. Olive oil treatment is a non-invasive and simple method to remove toning of copper coin. It will work for most lightly toned copper coin. Perhaps, I should emphases more about the acetone wash step. I did mention the wash step be performed just for “few seconds” and dry the coin immediately to make sure that no residue of acetone and moisture left on the coin surface. The best way is to use a squeezable solvent bottle to rinse the coin surface with acetone for few seconds. Please note that most acetone in the market does have a small amount of water in it. The dry away the water in the acetone is the key step of the treatment. Usually, use a hair dryer will do the job. The soap water is another way to remove the olive oil, followed with extra wash with de-ionized water to remove the soap residue on the coin surface, then, dry the coin with a hair dryer. My experience with few seconds acetone wash is very effective in remove olive oil and non-invasive. In addition, acetone rinse also can remove any potential “invisible PVC residue” on the coin surface. To minimize the risk, try to practice with a low value brass medal prior to expensive one.

Product such as “SafeClean”, which is the combination of vegetable oils and surfactants in water, based on the same scientific principal as mentioned above, also works very nicely to remove the toning and dirty deposit on the surface of copper coin.

In addition to the potential insurance coverage issue mentioned by PandaOrLunar, there is another unintended consequence to submit coin to NCS with a lower declared value. Usually, the lower value coin will be assigned to Jr. staff of NCS to do the conservation. Majority coin submitted to NCS is just a number to NCS staff, nothing special about it. But with a declared value of 5 figures, the coin may be handled very differently and the conservation job will be done by a more experience Sr. staff. 

Offline jc888888888

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #16 on: October 03, 2014, 03:34:43 PM »
" DIY conservation is part of fun for hobby in coin collection"
Really ??? LOL    I would certainly question how much fun potentially ruining a coin of that value is??    I have conserved a fair amount of coins,  probably have sent a few hundred to NCS  and at least a couple of thousand to NGC  ............. here is my rule for myself .if a coin is worth over $500 usd and it is silver ,brass or copper I leave it to the professionals, gold is way more forgiving to "conservation fun" so i raise my limit to $1000 .no one but a professional  should touch a coin of that value IMHO



Offline jc888888888

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #17 on: October 03, 2014, 03:42:14 PM »
AT NCS right now just as a testament to my last statement:

Coins for NCS Invoice Number 542xxxx
LineItem   Year   Mint Mark   Variety/Pedigree   Denom.   NCS Grade   NCS Grade   NCS Comments   NGC Invoice Number   NGC Grade   NGC Comments
001   2012 5oz   CHINA   PANDA   S50Y       n/a   n/a          
002   (1991)   CHINA   PANDA 10TH ANNIVERSARY   SILVER       n/a   n/a          
003   (1991)   CHINA   PANDA 10TH ANNIVERSARY   BRASS       n/a   n/a          
004   (1991)   CHINA   PANDA 10TH ANNIVERSARY   SILVER       n/a   n/a   

   Coins for NCS Invoice Number 542xxxx
LineItem   Year   Mint Mark   Variety/Pedigree   Denom.   NCS Grade   NCS Grade   NCS Comments   NGC Invoice Number   NGC Grade   NGC Comments
001   1998   CHINA   PANDA   S10Y       n/a   n/a   3970146       
002   2001   CHINA   SNAKE   S10Y       n/a   n/a   3970146       
003   2001   CHINA   SNAKE   S10Y       n/a   n/a   3970146       
004   (1988)   CHINA   PANDA HONG KONG EXPO   BRASS       n/a   n/a   3970146       
005   2007   CHINA   PIG   S10Y       n/a   n/a   3970146       
006   1999   CHINA   RABBIT   S10Y       n/a   n/a   3970146       
007   1985 1oz   CHINA   GREAT WALL   SILVER       n/a   n/a   3970146       
008   1985 1oz   CHINA   GREAT WALL   SILVER       n/a   n/a   3970146       
009   1991 PIEFORT   CHINA   PANDA   S10Y       n/a   n/a   3970146       
010   2006   CHINA   DOG   S10Y       n/a   n/a   3970146       
011   2003   CHINA   GOAT   S10Y       n/a   n/a   3970146       
012   2000   CHINA   DRAGON   S10Y       n/a   n/a   3970146   

I don't fool around doing DIY conservation on colored coins also : the point here is IMHO opinion leave  conservation to the professionals on high value coins   
    


Offline pandamonium

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #18 on: October 04, 2014, 05:52:37 PM »
comments from an article written by Peter Anthony
CHINESE COINS: 5-STAR PANDAS
Posted by Peter Anthony on 8/21/2014
The earliest and perhaps best known are the 1 Yuan brass Pandas that were minted from 1983-1985. Most of these were distributed as gifts or premiums by Panda coin distributors and dealers. Because brass readily reacts with air many surviving coins have black spots or other impairments. They are now highly collectible. MS 69 examples of 1983 and 1984 1 Yuan Pandas can sell for hundreds of dollars. The 1985 is considered a great rarity; auction prices for it have topped $50,000.

VERY EXCITING FIND!


1985 Brass Panda:   About 50 mintage, selling price of about $50,000 and $25,000 last one sold German auction.   Ngc 13 graded     PCGS 4 graded.    17 total.                                      1984 3.3 oz Great Wall:    About 68 mint & 3 versions      Asking price of $8,888      NGC has graded 7    
Why the big price difference?   Brass Panda was gift or premium?   Popularity?    Immature market?.......


[edit by SANDAC: fixing quote]
« Last Edit: October 04, 2014, 08:12:30 PM by SANDAC »

Offline SANDAC

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #19 on: October 04, 2014, 08:35:33 PM »
1985 Brass Panda:   About 50 mintage, selling price of about $50,000 and $25,000 last one sold German auction.   Ngc 13 graded     PCGS 4 graded.    17 total.     

17 graded for a total population of 50 would be quite extraordinary so I looked up NGC population, it is 6 for PFUC ( http://www.ngccoin.com/coin-census/world/china-panda-series-scid-367/yuan/1985-china-yuan-panda-coinid-888997 ) and 3 for PFCA ( http://www.ngccoin.com/coin-census/world/china-panda-series-scid-367/yuan/1985-china-yuan-panda-coinid-888998 ) so that's 9 for NGC.  PCGS shows 3 graded and they also show the population as 1,000 with a suggested $45,000 for OMP ( http://www.pcgs.com/prices/valueview/513378?cid=3725 )

Offline poconopenn

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2014, 12:43:55 AM »
PCGS shows 3 graded and they also show the population as 1,000 with a suggested $45,000 for OMP ( http://www.pcgs.com/prices/valueview/513378?cid=3725 )

PCGS CID 513378 is for PRDC. There is one graded as PRCA, CID:513377.

Offline aragog

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #21 on: October 05, 2014, 07:47:39 AM »
1985 Brass Panda:   About 50 mintage, selling price of about $50,000 and $25,000 last one sold German auction.   Ngc 13 graded     PCGS 4 graded.    17 total.                                      1984 3.3 oz Great Wall:    About 68 mint & 3 versions      Asking price of $8,888      NGC has graded 7   
Why the big price difference?   Brass Panda was gift or premium?   Popularity?    Immature market?.......


[edit by SANDAC: fixing quote]
You are comparing two different things: one - silver and medal with not exactly circulation coin, but from this category, I thing there is about 1000 times more collectors of circulation commemorative coins than those collecting silver coins of PRC. And about even 100x less collecting medals.
And for those collectors of non- PM coins this is a coin everyone is dreaming of. At least in my want list it is on the first place together with mint set of 1986 and PROOF version of 40 years of PRC. I am also collecting silver  PRC coins, but medal is something that I would buy at reasonable price a little above bullion value if the opportunity comes.
I attended local auction yesterday and the hall was almost empty, when the medals were sold. In case of coins and banknotes it was fully packed

Offline aragog

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #22 on: October 05, 2014, 07:50:03 AM »
But for this 1985 coin I donot think the price of $50000 is OK, One member of this forum posted the 67 grade coin that was sold at 40000 if I am not mistaken, search engine on this forum does not cooperate with me too well

Offline fwang2450

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #23 on: October 05, 2014, 07:46:11 PM »
You are comparing two different things: one - silver and medal with not exactly circulation coin, but from this category, I thing there is about 1000 times more collectors of circulation commemorative coins than those collecting silver coins of PRC. And about even 100x less collecting medals.
And for those collectors of non- PM coins this is a coin everyone is dreaming of. At least in my want list it is on the first place together with mint set of 1986 and PROOF version of 40 years of PRC. I am also collecting silver  PRC coins, but medal is something that I would buy at reasonable price a little above bullion value if the opportunity comes.
I attended local auction yesterday and the hall was almost empty, when the medals were sold. In case of coins and banknotes it was fully packed
I agree. It is not fair to compare coins meant for circulation, coins meant for collection only, and medals as art pieces. Circulating coins are everyday objects, with a low entry threshold and they have a much, much larger collector base. Relative rarity is the key to price rise, like the circulating coin to commemorate the 40 years of the People's Bank of China, which rose 3000 times in value since 1989, with a mintage of 2.06 million.

Offline pandamonium

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #24 on: October 06, 2014, 08:05:53 AM »
The price of rare coins meant for circulation are a bit too high for me, $20,000 to $50,000.   I will stick w/ the low price, low mintage medals as art pieces and some overlooked silver coins of PRC.   Medals are still seated at the back of the bus.   Hopefully as this market matures the unloved medals/silver coins will see some parity in price.   After all low mintage is just that.............anyway we look at it, this is a immature market w/ a bright future......

Offline fwang2450

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #25 on: November 27, 2014, 01:42:45 PM »
The price of rare coins meant for circulation are a bit too high for me, $20,000 to $50,000.   I will stick w/ the low price, low mintage medals as art pieces and some overlooked silver coins of PRC.   Medals are still seated at the back of the bus.   Hopefully as this market matures the unloved medals/silver coins will see some parity in price.   After all low mintage is just that.............anyway we look at it, this is a immature market w/ a bright future......
It costs a lot less to go into circulating coin collection than into the precious metal coin collection. The 85 copper Panda is a special case as it sits across both circulating coin and precious coin categories. The topmost circulating coin, 40 Year Anniversary of PRC proof, is about $20,000. But you can also spend 30 bucks on a 97 circulating coins set, which also has a big upside.

Mr. Sun Keqin's catalog on circulating coins will be updated early next year, with price guides. It has English translation in most sections. That will help with those interested in Chinese circulating coin collection.

Offline GoldenLord

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #26 on: November 28, 2014, 04:24:24 AM »
Now there are 10 Coins graded by NGC. My one is arrived on 11/26/14 too for Conservation and Grading.

What is the new geraded one? PFUC is now: 63:2 65:1 66:1 68:1 69:2   - i dont know what was it before?
Is there a way to Show me all pictires of this coins without the case number?

Offline 1668Chris

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #27 on: November 29, 2014, 07:18:57 AM »
It costs a lot less to go into circulating coin collection than into the precious metal coin collection. The 85 copper Panda is a special case as it sits across both circulating coin and precious coin categories. The topmost circulating coin, 40 Year Anniversary of PRC proof, is about $20,000. But you can also spend 30 bucks on a 97 circulating coins set, which also has a big upside.

Mr. Sun Keqin's catalog on circulating coins will be updated early next year, with price guides. It has English translation in most sections. That will help with those interested in Chinese circulating coin collection.

FWIW - I find trying to collect circulating proof coins from the US extremely challenging...they just don't exist.  Alternatively, proof sets offer an excellent entry point for beginner collectors....they are somewhat available in the US on an infrequent basis, have a low entry point in terms of price point, and have relatively low mintages for some of the later years 1991 -2000.

Here is an excellent link for some info. 

http://modernchinacoins.com/PROOF_%26_MINT_SETS.html


Offline jc888888888

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #28 on: November 30, 2014, 07:41:43 AM »
Now there are 10 Coins graded by NGC. My one is arrived on 11/26/14 too for Conservation and Grading.

What is the new geraded one? PFUC is now: 63:2 65:1 66:1 68:1 69:2   - i dont know what was it before?
Is there a way to Show me all pictires of this coins without the case number?
would love an update when you get it back!

Offline poconopenn

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Re: 1 Yuan Panda 1985 Brass
« Reply #29 on: November 30, 2014, 04:13:09 PM »
FWIW - I find trying to collect circulating proof coins from the US extremely challenging...they just don't exist.  Alternatively, proof sets offer an excellent entry point for beginner collectors....they are somewhat available in the US on an infrequent basis, have a low entry point in terms of price point, and have relatively low mintages for some of the later years 1991 -2000.

Here is an excellent link for some info.  

http://modernchinacoins.com/PROOF_%26_MINT_SETS.html



The modernchinacoins.com has not been updated price information since 2007. The current fair value of those proof sets may be 4-15 times higher than the listed price at this website.