Author Topic: Fake Lunar Coins in Fake Shanghai Mint Soft Pouch  (Read 3239 times)

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Offline poconopenn

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Fake Lunar Coins in Fake Shanghai Mint Soft Pouch
« on: May 01, 2010, 09:33:34 PM »

Offline poconopenn

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Re: Fake Lunar Coins in Fake Shanghai Mint Soft Pouch
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2010, 09:37:39 PM »
More pictures mentioned in the previous post. All pouches have a round corner. This suggests that coin was sealed in pouch individually, instead of a 10-coins sheet.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2010, 09:42:29 PM by poconopenn »

Offline pecus

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Re: Fake Lunar Coins in Fake Shanghai Mint Soft Pouch
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2010, 09:47:30 PM »
Poconopenn:

Great--and disturbing--post.  How do you know these coins are fake, apart from indications from the soft pouch?  Or, are we at a point at which the coins themselves look authentic, but the packaging is all we have to go on to know whether the coin is authentic?

Pecus

Offline poconopenn

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Re: Fake Lunar Coins in Fake Shanghai Mint Soft Pouch
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2010, 12:53:38 AM »
All five fake coins have the same surface reflection which suggests these coins are silver plated copper coins. The seller appears to have very limited knowledge of lunar coins. 1998 tiger and 1999 rabbit are proof (piedfort) 1 oz. The seller listed these two coins as BU. Attached are pictures of three reverse of genuine coins for comparison.

1998 tiger & 1999 rabbit: position and size of seven Chinese characters on top of date is clearly not the same.

2002 horse: position of first of seven Chinese characters on top of date in genuine coin is in the center of stairway, while the fake coin is on the right side of the stairway.

The other two coins have the same problems. The easiest way to detect the fake coin is to examine the lines between mirror and frosty surface. The genuine coin always has a clear lines.

By the way, a negative feedback (fake seller) was left to this seller by a very knowledgeable modern Chinese coin collector recently.    
« Last Edit: May 02, 2010, 01:17:54 AM by poconopenn »

Offline pecus

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Re: Fake Lunar Coins in Fake Shanghai Mint Soft Pouch
« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2010, 01:10:11 PM »
Poconopenn:

I have a kilo silver horse on which the letters above the date begin further to the left than the letters above the date on the 1 oz horse that you show a picture of here.  Do you know where the writing above the date on the kilo silver horse should be?  My coin is in a Shenzen soft pouch.

Offline poconopenn

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Re: Fake Lunar Coins in Fake Shanghai Mint Soft Pouch
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2010, 01:25:14 PM »
Pecus,

You have a genuine 1  kg horse. The seven Chinese characters in 1 kg coin is further to the left of 1 oz coin. In fact, it should be in the same position as fake 1 oz coin listed by this fake seller.

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Re: Fake Lunar Coins in Fake Shanghai Mint Soft Pouch
« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2010, 01:32:36 PM »
Poconopenn:

Thanks for your help!  I must say I was a bit worried for a moment. 

I wonder whether we are approaching a point where a publication of various fake coins, along with pictures of the genuine coins, would be worth someone's effort.  I know I'd be willing to buy one!

Pecus