Author Topic: Chinese Coins: Pandas Tip the Rarity Scale  (Read 813 times)

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Offline PandaCollector

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Chinese Coins: Pandas Tip the Rarity Scale
« on: April 12, 2017, 02:03:29 AM »
A historical benchmark offers a measuring stick for the scarcity of Panda coins, show Pandas and medals: Chinese Coins: Pandas Tip the Rarity Scale

https://www.ngccoin.com/news/article/5894/Chinese-Coins-Pandas/



Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
China Pricepedia
www.pandacollector.com

Offline ccl

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Re: Chinese Coins: Pandas Tip the Rarity Scale
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2017, 02:23:48 AM »
1985 Brass 12.7 gm. 1 Yuan Panda   Rarity 2 -- oops

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Re: Chinese Coins: Pandas Tip the Rarity Scale
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2017, 04:24:22 AM »
It would be much higher by population, but is a 2 by published mintage.

"As food for thought, here is a partial list of one ounce and smaller Pandas with their rarity ranking according to published mintage:"

Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
China Pricepedia
www.pandacollector.com

Offline KeepOnTrying!

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Re: Chinese Coins: Pandas Tip the Rarity Scale
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2017, 06:38:29 AM »
I can already see some problems using the rarity scale as defined. Published mintages could be very inaccurate from the word go whereas actual mintage could be more accurate but surviving mintage, if it can be determined, would be the most accurate determinant of the rarity scale.

Secondly, the practice of contrived low mintage, which is commonly used nowadays, accords a coin or medal a rarity scale that is artificially low, thereby boosting its purported value. But this value may not stand rigorous market force dynamics leaving the hapless collector/investor clutching a bag of low value metals.

Thanks for the article; another easy read informative thought provoking piece!
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Offline PandaCollector

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Re: Chinese Coins: Pandas Tip the Rarity Scale
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2017, 07:15:35 AM »
I can already see some problems using the rarity scale as defined. Published mintages could be very inaccurate from the word go whereas actual mintage could be more accurate but surviving mintage, if it can be determined, would be the most accurate determinant of the rarity scale.

Secondly, the practice of contrived low mintage, which is commonly used nowadays, accords a coin or medal a rarity scale that is artificially low, thereby boosting its purported value. But this value may not stand rigorous market force dynamics leaving the hapless collector/investor clutching a bag of low value metals.

There is another version of this article in the upcoming Gold & Silver Panda Coin Buyer's Guide 3. It does use population estimates. For the general public, rather than book readers, I chose to use published mintages.

No one knows how the low mintage numismatic issues from China will look twenty years from now. Pricewise, the ones from the 1980's and 1990's have generally done decently, or better, but not as well as some unplanned rarities.

Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
China Pricepedia
www.pandacollector.com

Offline pandamonium

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Re: Chinese Coins: Pandas Tip the Rarity Scale
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2017, 08:00:58 AM »
NGC Registry article   "PQ Panda Silver Medal Proofs"  by Hergert Collection 3/30/2017       Can someone post this link?.....   The market changes priorities as time marches on.    Once, graded MCC by the Chinese was considered almost taboo, it was OMP only.   Today grading MCC is accepted by Chinese.       Medals are still considered taboo, but that attitude will change too as the market matures.     In 6 yrs i have seen major priority changes in this small market.     What will be the common sense changes in the next 6 yrs?      Many are making estimates and trying to position themselves today............

Offline KeepOnTrying!

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Re: Chinese Coins: Pandas Tip the Rarity Scale
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2017, 11:05:54 AM »
1985 Brass 12.7 gm. 1 Yuan Panda   Rarity 2 -- oops

It would be much higher by population, but is a 2 by published mintage.

"As food for thought, here is a partial list of one ounce and smaller Pandas with their rarity ranking according to published mintage:"

Best wishes,
Peter Anthony
China Pricepedia
www.pandacollector.com

This excerpt further clarifies the issue: "If we consider actual mintages, or populations, some rank even higher. A 1988 Cincinnati is a Rarity-3 and a 1985 brass 1 Yuan Panda is a Rarity-4."

You probably have more accurate figures but a surviving population of less than 60 is commonly quoted for the 1985 Brass 1Yuan Panda coin, possibly making it a Rarity-5 coin.
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Offline pandamonium

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Re: Chinese Coins: Pandas Tip the Rarity Scale
« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2017, 12:53:47 PM »
1985 brass panda.   Goldenlord last comment was NGC had 16 total pop.    What is NGC pop today?..

How about the 1982? 84? 3.3 oz silver Great Wall and plum tree.   How do they rate?     Last i hear the price is about 1/4 of the 85 brass panda but similar mintage.    Graded pop?   Any info?...