Main > General Discussion

TUTORIAL: How to avoid being a bad SELLER

(1/6) > >>

Panda Halves:
1: Certification numbers MATTER
As a buyer, collector, and infrequent seller of certified coins I can tell you that the certification number is what matters in certified coin transactions. As a seller; when you provide a prospective buyer with a certification number, then the buyer is buying THAT coin. Not a coin similar to the coin, not a coin with a preconceived variety that may or may not be like the coin with the certification number but the buyer is buying a very specific coin that is viewable on a Registered coin Database. The buyer can see the official photos from the grading company and compare them with any information the seller provides to determine if the coin has any flaws, features, or special characteristics which make it worth purchasing. This metric applies to ALL Certified coins from the most inexpensive to the most expensive.

2: Failing to deliver coins is BAD for the market
Holding back coins and making partial shipments is a horrible practice. The bottom line is that sellers don’t know what impact a single seemingly insignificant coin may have to another collector or especially a dealer. Perhaps the $200 coin failed to deliver upon is the last piece of a $200,000 deal that the dealer needs to close on to deliver a lot of coins to a client. Thus, what the potential seller sees as a $200 error may cause exponentially greater financial problems for the other party.

3: Learn from your MISTAKES
If a seller cannot afford to make $500 mistakes that result from sending the wrong certification numbers then said seller should double-check details before sending certification numbers. It is the seller’s responsibility to protect inventory, ensure accuracy, and deliver coins as agreed upon.. It doesn’t matter if the seller chooses a wife, daughter, or crazy uncle Earl to send certification numbers and verification information, if this person is acting as a trusted agent for the seller then the deal should stand. If the seller cannot afford for a trusted agent to make a mistake then the seller should take the time to send the information personally.
Sometimes mistakes happen and this is when it is time to own up to the mistake and do the right thing and not the most profitable thing. By doing the right thing sellers can establish fantastic reputations. Sellers who don’t own up to mistakes don’t have a chance to learn from them are hence are more apt to make future mistakes. I typically avoid dealing with these types of people.

 N40

SANDAC:
Well said.

One point I like to add is to put some efforts into communication.  In this e-commerce age, we are what we write.  Buyers can easily be turned off by flippant comments regardless of how good a merchandise may look.

joeman:
 :lol:just to present the flip side of the coin, everything you said has a fair degree of accuracy, but take one to thing into account ,mistakes are made ,intent is everything in a transaction, honesty by both BUYER and seller are paramount ,and since you readily admit being a infrequent seller , I might offer you some tutoring, As a seller you do not amass literally 100,s of 100% positive feedbacks and hundreds of delighted buyers in a difficult,stringent selling environment like e bay,without going above and beyond for your customer,s and 1000,s of transactions outside of e bay with the huge amount of delighted buyer ,But when a buyer clearly buys something at a price and then believes he can scam something else for the same price that is simply wrong and we revert right back to rule #1  honesty by both BUYER and seller are paramount

Birdman:

--- Quote from: Panda Halves on December 15, 2012, 02:56:36 AM ---1: Certification numbers MATTER
As a buyer, collector, and infrequent seller of certified coins I can tell you that the certification number is what matters in certified coin transactions. As a seller; when you provide a prospective buyer with a certification number, then the buyer is buying THAT coin. Not a coin similar to the coin, not a coin with a preconceived variety that may or may not be like the coin with the certification number but the buyer is buying a very specific coin that is viewable on a Registered coin Database. The buyer can see the official photos from the grading company and compare them with any information the seller provides to determine if the coin has any flaws, features, or special characteristics which make it worth purchasing. This metric applies to ALL Certified coins from the most inexpensive to the most expensive.

2: Failing to deliver coins is BAD for the market
Holding back coins and making partial shipments is a horrible practice. The bottom line is that sellers don’t know what impact a single seemingly insignificant coin may have to another collector or especially a dealer. Perhaps the $200 coin failed to deliver upon is the last piece of a $200,000 deal that the dealer needs to close on to deliver a lot of coins to a client. Thus, what the potential seller sees as a $200 error may cause exponentially greater financial problems for the other party.

3: Learn from your MISTAKES
If a seller cannot afford to make $500 mistakes that result from sending the wrong certification numbers then said seller should double-check details before sending certification numbers. It is the seller’s responsibility to protect inventory, ensure accuracy, and deliver coins as agreed upon.. It doesn’t matter if the seller chooses a wife, daughter, or crazy uncle Earl to send certification numbers and verification information, if this person is acting as a trusted agent for the seller then the deal should stand. If the seller cannot afford for a trusted agent to make a mistake then the seller should take the time to send the information personally.
Sometimes mistakes happen and this is when it is time to own up to the mistake and do the right thing and not the most profitable thing. By doing the right thing sellers can establish fantastic reputations. Sellers who don’t own up to mistakes don’t have a chance to learn from them are hence are more apt to make future mistakes. I typically avoid dealing with these types of people.

 N40

--- End quote ---

Good insights, on several specifics, PH.

That general rule to "treat people the way you'd like to be treated" also applies.


--- Quote from: Panda Halves on December 15, 2012, 02:56:36 AM ---
Sometimes mistakes happen and this is when it is time to own up to the mistake and do the right thing and not the most profitable thing.

--- End quote ---

Doing the right thing might also end up being the most profitable thing...in the long run.

I'm scared to add up how much I've ended up spending with some sellers  :scared: , because I keep writing them check after check after check.  When the service and selection are good, a buyer keeps coming back for more.  And they recommend that seller to other buyers...

dynamike51:

--- Quote from: Panda Halves on December 15, 2012, 02:56:36 AM ---1: Certification numbers MATTER
As a buyer, collector, and infrequent seller of certified coins I can tell you that the certification number is what matters in certified coin transactions. As a seller; when you provide a prospective buyer with a certification number, then the buyer is buying THAT coin. Not a coin similar to the coin, not a coin with a preconceived variety that may or may not be like the coin with the certification number but the buyer is buying a very specific coin that is viewable on a Registered coin Database. The buyer can see the official photos from the grading company and compare them with any information the seller provides to determine if the coin has any flaws, features, or special characteristics which make it worth purchasing. This metric applies to ALL Certified coins from the most inexpensive to the most expensive.

2: Failing to deliver coins is BAD for the market
Holding back coins and making partial shipments is a horrible practice. The bottom line is that sellers don’t know what impact a single seemingly insignificant coin may have to another collector or especially a dealer. Perhaps the $200 coin failed to deliver upon is the last piece of a $200,000 deal that the dealer needs to close on to deliver a lot of coins to a client. Thus, what the potential seller sees as a $200 error may cause exponentially greater financial problems for the other party.

3: Learn from your MISTAKES
If a seller cannot afford to make $500 mistakes that result from sending the wrong certification numbers then said seller should double-check details before sending certification numbers. It is the seller’s responsibility to protect inventory, ensure accuracy, and deliver coins as agreed upon.. It doesn’t matter if the seller chooses a wife, daughter, or crazy uncle Earl to send certification numbers and verification information, if this person is acting as a trusted agent for the seller then the deal should stand. If the seller cannot afford for a trusted agent to make a mistake then the seller should take the time to send the information personally.
Sometimes mistakes happen and this is when it is time to own up to the mistake and do the right thing and not the most profitable thing. By doing the right thing sellers can establish fantastic reputations. Sellers who don’t own up to mistakes don’t have a chance to learn from them are hence are more apt to make future mistakes. I typically avoid dealing with these types of people.

 N40


--- End quote ---

PH:

Well stated. Apparently, "someone" is not heeding your advice, though.   :(

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version